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20130331
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 73 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Mar 19, 2013 3:00pm PDT
're not talking about secular model of reform meaning changes to church teaching on matters such as abortion or birth control. instead they're talking about changes in business management in the vatican towards making the bureaucracy here more transparent, that is both internally and externally, making it clearer who's making decisions and why and also doing a better job communicating with the outside world towards making it more accountable. that is the idea that there ought to be penalties for poor performance and towards making it efficient. the notion being is that there thinking in centuries may have cut it once upon a while but in a 21st century world it simply doesn't do it anymore. that's what these cardinals mean by reform and they have embraced pope francis tasman who can deliver it. whether it plays out in practice that way, of course, remains to be seen. >> brown: is there an expectation that on one key matter the sexual abuse scandals that he has to do something fairly quickly,? whether it's make a gesture or take action? >> well, i think it's very clear to anyone who's been pay
PBS
Mar 13, 2013 3:00pm PDT
a certain amount of change. i just want to caution -- i think a lot of americans think -- when they think of reform and change they think we're going to have women priests. that was not a realistic expectation given the cardinals who were in there. i think what they mean by reform touched other issues, partly reorganization of the curia, its relationships with local bishops and, again, are we going to focus a little bitless maybe on the traditional latin mass and a little bit more on caring for the poor. >> ifill: so this is not a pope or a papacy we're going to see any kind of change when it comes to things like abortion or -- >> of course not. >> ifill: gay marriage. >> of course not. >> ifill: or adoption or any social issues that get us so worked up, especially in the united states? >> no, and these are not issues in the latin american church. when 50% of your people are living below the poverty line, shame on you if you're worried about other issues like that. you've got to be very hand on worried about feeding your people so they don't go to bet hungry at night. >> ifill: he was quo
PBS
Mar 15, 2013 6:00pm PDT
to take that position. portman explained his change of heart in "the columbus dispatch". he said it began two years ago, when his college-age son told his family that he is gay. wall street backed up a bit as the week ended. that ended a ten-day winning streak by the dow jones industrial average-- its longest in 17 years. the dow industrial average lost 25 points to close at 14,514. the nasdaq fell nearly 10 points to close at 3,249. for the week, the dow gained just under 1%. the nasdaq rose a tenth of a percent. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: thousands of activists gathered this week for one of the conservative movement's biggest events. "newshour" congressional corresspondent kwame holman was there. >> reporter: for four decades the conservative political action conference known as "c- pac" has served as a barometer for republican politics. and this year, the g.o.p.'s future direction is the issue for more than 10,000 delegates who've been meeting just outside washington. at the last few gatherings of c- pac, the focus was on taking back the
PBS
Mar 4, 2013 3:00pm PST
everything that we can to combat the threat of climate change, that we're going to be creating jobs and economic opportunity in the first place. they are going to be a great team. these are some of my top priorities going forward. >> ifill: moniz is an m.i.t. physicist who runs an energy initiative on new ways to produce power and curb emissions. he also served as undersecretary of energy during the clinton administration. mccarthy already works in the administration as assistant administrator for the e.p.a.'s office of air and radiation. she has run state environmental agencies in connecticut and massachusetts, working for five governors including mitt romney. moniz and mccarthy would replace outgoing cabinet members steven chu and lisa jackson. early last month the president also tapped business executive sally jewel to replace ken salazar as interior secretary. the nominees face major challenges. one imminent decision involves debate over approval of the keystone ex-seal pipeline that would move crude oil from canada to the gulf. the project has drawn environmental protests but a
PBS
Mar 12, 2013 3:00pm PDT
to what we heard from them in the past. they want to change medicare for people starting in 2024 and turn it into more of a voucher program where people go out and buy their own private health insurance. they want to block grant things like medicaid and food stamps so that it goes through state funding. it changes from an open entitlement program to something that will only support people as long as the money lasts. and they want to unwind some things that federal government spends money on, like housing giants fannie mae and freddie mac. but these are really policies that we have heard from them before. there wasn't a lot of new substance there. >> brown: in fact you were at the press conference. i was watching a reporter pointed that out to paul ryan. he was sort of... we saw a little bit of it. he was unapologetically continuing on, no matter what happened in the election, right? >> there's a feeling on the part of the house republicans that although the presidential election was lost for the republican party, the house republicans feel like they still maintain the majority in the hous
PBS
Mar 18, 2013 3:00pm PDT
a change in the way business is done here would affect other states who may be lined up also with laws that preempt or somehow trump federal law? >> well, as deputy solicitor general said. if the federal law is just viewed as a floor here. for example, if arizona wins, then he said states can impose additional requirements on registration, and the federal lawl itself becomes a nullity. that is the fear of a lot of organizations from the orgses that brought the challenge to the league of women voters that filed an amicus brief supporting the challengers. congress' intent here was to make registration easier. they fear that if arizona wins, then other states are going to impose other kinds of requirements, not just proof of citizenship. so that is the real concern. if arizona loses, there is no change. on the other hand, the final word may rest with congress. whatever the supreme court does, congress could go and amend the national voter registration act. >> ifill: sounds like there could be a consequential ruling. >> it's definitely a very important case and playing out against this bac
PBS
Mar 14, 2013 3:00pm PDT
at the brookings institution. and gordon chang. he was an attorney in hong kong for twenty years. now, an author and contributor to forbes.com. let me start with you ken lieberthal. what do we need to know about xi jinping? >> the most important thing we know is he's going to govern china for the next decade and that will be enormously important for china, asia and globally. he's worked his way up to every level of the chinese political system so he's a very experienced politician and administrator. he's coming on a program saying he's trying to clean up corruption, revitalize the communist party and keep in the power and use these capabilities to reform the chinese economic system while maintaining or building military strength. >> woodruff: is there something about his background we should know? >> his father is a comrade of mow say dung, which makes him a princeling. he's the first communist party to be born after the communist leadership came to power. xi jinping is in a system and a politburo at least for maybe five of those seven member bodies are conservatives, the hard line anti-reformer
PBS
Mar 28, 2013 3:00pm PDT
really have had a lot of change in those kinds of broad public perceptions. that's different than the question of what a person might say coming from an underlying bubbly cal world view or the christian faith. but i think there's been a lot of motion in our culture over the course of these last 17 years or so. >> suarez: during the time there's been a lot of motion, that has church basically -- or your branch of the church, stayed in the same place? >> i think so. i would argue that really the christian faith has always been somewhat out of tune with the cultural ethics of the time. if you go back to new testament times you have greco-roman culture that certainly didn't embody christian values in terms of human sexuality and christianity was countercultural and the old testament religion was countercull dhourl the canaanite context. so it isn't that big for us to feel out of step with our culture at some given time. >> suarez: reverend schuenemeyer the same question. did the united church of christ look at the same shifts in the culture and come from a different conclusion than pr
PBS
Mar 1, 2013 3:00pm PST
court to strike down the ban as unconstitutional. the president once opposed gay marriage, but changed his stance during his re-election campaign. he said today he and the country have evolved. >> when the supreme court essentially called the question by taking this case about california's law, i didn't feel like that was something that this administration could avoid. i felt it was important for us to articulate what i believe and what this administration stands for. >> sreenivasan: 200 congressional democrats also filed a brief today urging the court to overturn the california ban. they join more than 100 prominent republicans who voiced their support earlier in the week. the justices will hear oral arguments in late march. a federal judge in california has cut a $1 billion damage award in the apple-samsung fight by nearly half. samsung will now have to pay apple just under $600 million for infringing on smart phone and tablet computer patents. the judge also ordered a new trial on some of apple's allegations in the case. wall street ended the week with small gains. the dow jones ind
PBS
Mar 25, 2013 3:00pm PDT
to some of his credibility in the job and saying we have to offer something more. we have to change our strategy and present something that changes the calculus on the ground in syria or we're not going to breakthrough this. >> ifill: the quick sandals for secretary of states or presidents for decades has been the arab-israeli peace process. do we detect any shifting toward more engagement on the part of the u.s. in that process or is that yet another thankless task waiting for the secretary? >> president obama just made this important trip to israel. i think a very necessary trip and so he's now established a much better relationship with the israeli people and some ability to expert influence there. so that prepares the ground a bit but the actual conflict itself i think is no more ripe for diplomacy right now than has been for a long time but secretary kerry seems determined that he wants to try. the question is, you know, will president obama really back him? because we know that in the end this is the kind of a conflict where you need the white house involved. it very quickly becom
PBS
Mar 29, 2013 3:00pm PDT
. the obama administration announced the proposed changes today: they would require two-thirds less sulfur in gasoline and a reduction in other emissions beginning in 2017. they also would set tighter pollution limits for new vehicles themselves at the same time. the e.p.a. says it would reduce premature deaths and improve public health for a minimal cost. but opponents say it could hit consumers at the pump by adding as much as nine cents a gallon. juliet eilperin broke this story for the "washington post" and she joins me now. welcome to the newshour. >> thanks so much. >> so why is the obama administration doing this, putting these proposals out there? >> there are a couple of reasons. one is the fact that they are requiring vehicles to be cleaner in the years ahead. they've basically reduced greenhouse-gas emissions from these vehicles. and so you will see between 2016 and 2025, the vehicles are going to become much more efficient, get more piles -- miles per gallon. so one of the things automakers are asking for is for cleaner fuels because the sulfur in gasoline really affects the ca
PBS
Mar 14, 2013 5:30pm PDT
, we assess what the change means for china, and the united states and the biggest issues between them: trade, defense and cyber security. >> brown: then, as pope francis embarks on his first full day as pontiff, we examine his roots in argentina. >> woodruff: margaret warner talks to michigan governor rick snyder after he recommended an emergency manager to take over the finances of the troubled city of detroit. >> we've got at least 50 years of this problem growing and a lot of people on good faith in the past have tried to solve it and have been unsuccessful. so the way i view it as is this is all hands on deck. >> brown: spencer michels has the story of the high tech splash of lights transforming san francisco's bay bridge into a work of art. >> it was overwhelming. it was really very, very exciting. it's meant to be open ended, highly subjective so you can just relax, view the piecend take fom iwhat you will. >> woodruff: and r suarez looks at life in japan, two years after the devastation caused by the tsunami and nuclear disaster. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshou
PBS
Feb 28, 2013 6:00pm PST
. >> thank you. >> brown: now to the conflict in syria and a change in the united states' role. ray suarez explains. >> the united states has decided that given the stakes the president will now extend food and medical supplies to the opposition including to the syrian opposition's supreme military council. so there will be direct assistance, though non-lethal. >> suarez: word of the shift in u.s. policy came from secretary of state john kerry in rome. the upshot: for the first time, humanitarian aid will be directly channeled to armed syrian rebel groups. the initial installment: $60 million. >> this funding will allow the opposition to reach out and help the local councils to be able to rebuild in their liberated areas of syria, so that they can provide basic services to people who often lack access today to medical care, to food, to sanitation. >> suarez: additional pledges are expected from ten other european and arab nations attending the rome gathering. but after two years of war in syria and more than 70,000 dead what the rebels most want are guns. so far, the united states has refu
PBS
Mar 27, 2013 3:00pm PDT
is married, why in 1996 did they change the rules when it looked like same-sex couples might begin to marry and impose a federal definition. secondly, when you have all these protections available to married people, you know, why are you taking people from massachusetts, connecticut, vermont, and saying ther marriages don't count for social security and family medical leave and treating them like they're single even though they're legally committed in marriage. >> woodruff: let's talk about the two different streams of argument today, one loosely discrimination, the other one loosely the federal versus the states. and, ken klukowski, does one of those strands of argument have greater weight, did you think, today? what you heard? >> well, the reality is that i think looking at it from a different aspect, doma filled in the blanks -- there are a lot of blank, about 1100 provisions of federal law. for example, filing taxes. if you're going to file a joint married tax return, it's the tax code that specifies that if you are married but separated from your spouse-- now, you're still legally marr
PBS
Mar 21, 2013 3:00pm PDT
if the people do not demand that they do. you must create the change that you want to see. >> warner: the evening closed with a state dinner; tomorrow, the president leaves for jordan. >> brown: a short time ago, i spoke to margaret in jerusalem. >> brown: margaret, start with the speech there in jerusalem. the president has been unpopular in israel. he specifically targeted young israelis in this major address. what did officials there tell you about the message he wanted to get across? >> warner: jeff, he wanted to do very much what he did in the 2008 campaign as a senator in which he directly appealed to younger and uninvolved citizens, people who have been apolitical in the past to get engaged and get involved and actually believe they can change their country. and really very resonant of the '80 8 campaign. he had one line at the end where he said "as we face the twilight of israel's founding generation, young people of israel must claim the future." now, he spent a lot of time talk to some of the founding generation or their sons and daughters here but he is saying to the israe
PBS
Mar 7, 2013 3:00pm PST
today warned senate democrats not to make significant changes to the house version. >> i would urge democrat leaders in the senate to not get greedy and get carried away and try to put forward the possibility of a government shutdown. >> reporter: senate democrats plan to pass their own version of a government funding bill, but majority leader harry reid said this week he's "cautiously optimistic" about getting an agreement with the house. >> woodruff: and to our newsmaker interview with the leader of the democrats in the house of representatives. i spoke with her a short time ago. house minority leader nuclear weapons, welcome to the newshour. >> my pleasure to be here. >> woodruff: so president obama is making this very public effort now to reach out to congressional republicans. there was a dinner with 12 senators last night. he had lunch today with house budget committee chairman paul ryan, there were phone calls. is all this a good idea. >> before we go to far with paul ryan and chris van holland, the ranking democrat on the budget committee as well. it's always a good idea to
PBS
Mar 21, 2013 5:30pm PDT
on how broadband technoly is changing our lives. tonight, a look at chattanooga, tennessee-- home of the nation's fastest internet connections. >> sreenivasan: and, spencer michaels has the story of photo journalists who risked their lives to tell the stories of iraqis in the early days of the war. >> as photographers, we're always looking for ways to communicate the urgency of horrible drama in these situations. >> brown: that's all ahead. on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: president obama called on young israelis to see the world through palestinian eyes and challenge
PBS
Mar 27, 2013 10:00pm PDT
were married in the state, they changed the rule to make sure married same-sex couples would not be included. quiet becomes is there a justification for making a new rule? and the justification that's been advanced by mr. clement is really around this idea of uniformity, that it's important to treat all gay people alike. but we have a system-- when we're talking about federal marital benefits and burns of treating married people. and we have an anomaly where we're treating married gay people as though they're unmarried as opposed to treating all married people aligning, whether they're gay or nongay. the uniformity thing doesn't seem to make a lot of sense. >> woodruff: how do you answer that? >> i think there is a legitimate federal role here. the reason i raise polygamy isn't to raise a far-off issue. litigation has started. jonathan turley, a professor at george washington, is pursuing litigation in utalk saying if there is a right to same-sex marriage, there is a right to polygamy. he's saying i'm all for that. i don't think the government should discriminate on that base
PBS
Mar 22, 2013 3:00pm PDT
for next week. but some parents see the potential change as something positive. >> i feel it would be a great opportunity for her to get outside of the neighborhood school and go to a better school. >> brown: the chicago board of education is expected to vote on the measure in may. declining enrollment has also forced other major cities like washington d.c. and philadelphia to close scores of public schools in recent years. we take up the debate now with two people at the center of the fight. we start with jesse ruiz. he's vice president of the chicago board of education. he was appointed to that post by mayor rahm emanuel in 2011. i spoke with him a short time ago. welcome to you, so why is such a dramatic action so necessary? is this resources, money, pure and simple? >> no. it is two-fold. one, we are looking at a record budget deficit of about $1 billion next year. so we're looking for every aspect to reap savings in our system. and we have underutilized schools as a result from it population loss in certain parts of the city of chicago. it's healthy for those schools to right
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 73 (some duplicates have been removed)